How To Sort Out Education Topics For Research Paper

Sorting out topics for an education paper can be difficult, especially if you are interested in a number of different topics in the education field. So what can you do in order to sort out the topics that you want to explore for a research paper? Here are some questions that you can think through in order to determine what you want to write about.

What does the instructor want? This is the first thing that you need to ask yourself. What does it look like your professor wants you to get out of this paper? If the class you are writing your research paper for is about educational policy, you don’t want to write a paper about techniques that people use in early childhood education. If you’re unclear on the instructions, take some time to talk to your professor to get a better idea.

What are you interested in? There are literally thousands of topics that you can look at in the field of education. But what do you actually care about? Are you into a particular type of education (science, math, language arts, etc)? Are you interested in information about a particular population of people (minorities, those with special needs, etc)? Your interests are always a good place for you to start exploring.

What do you know about? It can be fun for you to explore a topic that you know absolutely nothing about, if you have the time to spend learning about it. So you may be better off deciding on a topic that you at least know a little bit about. What education topics do you at least know a little bit about? Those may be good talking points as well. Is the topic that you’re interested in too broad? Too narrow? Many times, students make the mistakes of choosing research topics that are way too broad. Here’s an example. You may want to explore the effects of spending cuts on education. That’s really, really broad and can differ depending on the region that the school is in. But if you want to go with the effects on spending cuts in education on creative arts programs in Pennsylvania, you’ve suddenly gotten way too narrow. Instead, find a middle ground; the effect of spending cuts in education on creative arts programs on the East Coast (or the Northeast, that’s still broad enough) is much better than both of those options.